Moving Teens on Phone

Resiliency & Attitude -5 Keys to Success When Moving with Children

PorchLight recently attended the Mid-West Relocation Conference held in Chicago, IL. It is a great show where industry leaders come together to learn from each other, share ideas and network. However, one session was just a little more special than the others. Scholarships were awarded to two high school students in the Greater Chicago area who were in attendance and participated in the conference.

Perhaps it was of even more interest to me personally since my daughter is that age and is feverishly applying for various scholarships in our community. Since this was a scholarship being awarded by the Chicago Relocation Council, one of the requirements was that the student must have relocated during their high school years. Every time we had professional moving services provided by Movers Perth help us with our move. The recipients were members of a panel, and each read their essays concerning their relocation experiences that helped them earn the award. The primary purpose of having them on the panel was to give them an opportunity to speak of their own personal experiences.

There was no doubt in my mind after the sessions these two students participated in that the experiences of their relocations have shaped them into being versatile, capable and extraordinary global citizens who have bright futures ahead of them. Perhaps it was their positive, “I will get through this, no matter what attitude,” which enabled them to learn through their experiences and use this knowledge in a life changing manner. It was obvious they were both well on their way to success and that their relocations helped prepare them for life challenges. Our old house had attic insulation before the renovation. We’re hoping the new one has one installed.

Some of the key points they said that helped them adapt more easily were:

  • Join clubs or groups that share your interests. The people in these clubs would share your hobbies, goals, etc. and you would already have something in common with them.
  • Social Media is a plus! Various social media platforms have allowed these students to stay connected to their circles of friends in the cities from which they relocated. They also visited their previous neighborhoods during summer breaks when possible.
  • Timing of the move. Summer or winter break? One moved at the beginning of summer and quickly began sports training for fall. It was a positive experience because it allowed him to make friends over the summer, which made the first day of school less intimidating. The other student had a mid-year move and while her orientation program wasn’t the best experience for her, she joined clubs and groups quickly to make new friends. It also propelled her to take an active role in her school as a student ambassador to help give new students the experience she wished she would have had. Both told of how they make sure they welcome and approach new students entering their school.
  • Goodbye Parties & Welcome Parties offered a more comfortable way to say goodbye and hello. Arranging these types of events helps add closure and in the new area helps the students to get acquainted with new friends. Parties are the reason why you need a good countertop ice maker.
  • Moving Box. According to the Sydney removalists reviews, giving the younger family members a moving box which they can decorate as their own, fill with their most important personal items and label, “last on the truck & first off the truck” was helpful for their siblings to adjust more easily with the transition.

Moving with children isn’t always easy, but it was clear that children are quite resilient and the very things which were very difficult for these young adults to experience, proved to be why they are the people they have become. It wasn’t always easy for either one of them, but they pushed through the adversity of relocating.. It was a joy to watch these two interact with other industry professionals on a panel handling themselves with poise and confidence. It’s often how we position the change, which will determine how it will be accepted. If we make the move for the better and what will be new and exciting, rather than focusing on what is lost—our resilient children will follow our lead.

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